Undergraduate Courses

For complete descriptions and prerequisites for all courses offered by the Department, please refer to the University of Pittsburgh catalog at https://catalog.upp.pitt.edu. All courses are offered for three credits except where otherwise noted.

General Education and Foundational Courses

Class Course Description Prerequisites and notes
MATH 0010 - College Algebra Part 1

(1.5 Credits)

First of a two course sequence which covers the topics of linear equations and inequalities and their graphs, quadratic equations and their graphs, and systems of equations and their graphs. This course is intended for students who need to learn elementary algebra over an extended period of time.

Syllabus Example

This course is equivalent to the first half of Math 0031

MATH 0020 - College Algebra Part 2

(1.5 Credits)

Second of two courses (0010-0020) which covers polynomials, rational functions and exponential and logarithmic growth. This course is intended for students who need to learn algebra over an extended period of time.

Syllabus Example

MATH 0010

This course is equivalent to the first half of Math 0031

MATH 0025 - Applied College Algebra

(3 Credits)

This course is designed for non-math majors or non-science majors. This course will parallel the topics in MATH 0031, but will stress real life data, problem solving and the use of technology to aid in mathematical understanding. 

Syllabus Example

This is an applied algebra course for nonscience majors.
MATH 0031 - Algebra

(3 Credits)

The course covers basic algebra skills. Linear, polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions are included. Systems of linear equations are also covered.

Syllabus Example

 
MATH 0032 - Trigonometry and Functions

(2 Credits)

This course is designed to enable students who have mastered algebra to learn trigonometry. Besides trigonometry, material of graphing and polynomials is included.

C or better in MATH 0031 or MATH PLACEMENT SCORE at least 61
MATH 0100 - Prep for Business Calculus

(3 Credits)

This course will increase and reinforce the student's algebra skills by emphasizing the manipulation of formulas, the graphing of functions and the extensive use of problem solving.

 
MATH 0120 - Business Calculus

(4 Credits)

This course introduces the basic concepts of limits, continuity, differentiation, integration, maximization and minimization. Applications to the social sciences, especially business and economics, are stressed.

Syllabus Example

C or better in MATH 0031, C or better in MATH 0020, or MATH PLACEMENT SCORE at least 61

Credit will not be given for both MATH 0120 and 0220

MATH 0125 - Calculus for Business 1

(2 Credits)

This is the first half of a two course sequence (0125-0126). It will cover concepts such as limits, continuity, differentiation and integration. Maximization and minimization of functions will also be covered, with emphasis placed on applications in the social sciences, especially business and economics.

Syllabus Example

C or better in MATH 0031, C or better in MATH 0020, or MATH PLACEMENT SCORE at least 61
MATH 0126 - Calculus for Business 2

(2 Credits)

This is the second half of the two sequence course (0125-0126). It provides an introduction to calculus for students in business, economics and other social sciences.

Syllabus Example

MATH 0125
MATH 0200 - Prep for Scientific Calculus

(3 Credits)

A variety of topics are studied: functions, rational functions, logarithmic and exponential functions, graphs, asymptotes, inverse, conic sections, translation and rotation of axes, trigonometric identities and equations, and possibly vectors.

Syllabus Example

C or better in MATH 0031, C or better in MATH 0020, or MATH PLACEMENT SCORE at least 61

This course may not be taken for credit by students who have successfully completed MATH 0032, 0100, or any calculus course.

MATH 0205 - Bridge to Calculus

(1 Credit) 

The goal of the course is to fill the gap between Math 0120 Business Calculus and Math 0220 Calculus 1 in order for a student to fulfill Calculus requirement and/or meet a prerequisite for Math 0230 Calculus 2. The following topics are not covered in Math 0120 Business Calculus comparing to Math 0220 Calculus 1 and therefore will be covered by this course:-Trigonometric functions and their properties -Limits, derivatives, and integrals of functions that involve trigonometric functions -Linear Approximation -Indeterminate Forms and L'Hospital's Rule -Related Rates that involve trigonometric functions.

C or better in MATH 0120
MATH 0220 - Analytic Geometry and Calculus 1

(4 Credits)

This is the first of a sequence of three basic calculus courses. It covers the derivative and integral of functions of one variable and their applications.

Syllabus Example

C or better in MATH 0032, C or better in MATH 0200 or MATH PLACEMENT SCORE at least 76

Credit will not be given for both MATH 0120 and 0220

MATH 0230 - Analytic Geometry and Calculus 2

(4 Credits)

This is the second of a sequence of three basic calculus courses. It covers the calculus of transcendental functions, techniques of integration, series of numbers and functions, polar coordinates, and conic sections.

Syllabus Example

C or better in MATH 0220
MATH 0235 - Honors 1 - Variable Calculus

(4 Credits)

An enriched version of MATH 0220/0230. Course will cover same topics but in greater depth and with more challenging problems, computer experimentation and applications using maple. This course is intended for honors students. 

Consent of the Honors College
MATH 0240 - Analytic Geometry and Calculus 3

(4 Credits)

This is the third of a sequence of three basic calculus courses. It covers vectors and surfaces in space and the calculus of functions of several variables including partial derivatives and multiple integrals, stokes theorem, and first order differential equations.

Syllabus Example

C or better in MATH 0230
Math 0245 - Honors 1 - Multivariable Calculus

(4 Credits)

An enriched version of MATH 0240. Course will cover same topics but in greater depth and with more challenging problems and applications. This course is intended for honors students.

Consent of the Honors College
MATH 0250 - Matrix Theory & Differential Equations

(4 Credtis)

The topics include matrix algebra, vector spaces, linear transformations, linear differential equations with constant coefficients, and systems of first order linear differential equations. Matrix techniques are used extensively in the differential equations part of the course.

C or Better in MATH 0230
MATH 0280 - Intro to Matrices and Linear Algebra

(3 Credits)

The principal topics which this course will cover include vectors, matrices, determinants, linear transformations, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, and selected applications.

Syllabus Example

C or better in MATH 0220

Credit will not be given for both MATH 0280 and 1180

MATH 0290 - Differential Equations

(3 Credits)

This course presents an introduction to the theory of differential equations from an applied perspective. Topics include linear and nonlinear ordinary differential equations, Laplace transform, and introduction to partial differential equations.

Syllabus Example

MATH 0230

Credit will not be given for both MATH 0290 and 1270

MATH 0400 - Finite Mathematics

(3 Credits)

The course covers the basic concepts of set theory, logic, combinatorics, Boolean algebra, and graph theory with an orientation towards applications.

Syllabus Example

C or better in Math 0031, C or better in Math 0020, OR math placement score at least 61
MATH 0413 - Intro Theoretical Mathematics

(4 Credits)

This course is an introduction to the theoretical treatment of sets, functions, relations, numbers, sequences, and limits. Classwork and homework concentrate reading and writing of proofs of theorems centered on these topics.

Syllabus Example

Syllabus Example

MATH 0230 or 0235 and ENGCMP (0200 or 0203 or 205, etc)
MATH 0420 - Intro Theoretical 1-Variable Calculus

(3 Credits)

The course provides a careful treatment of the theoretical concepts of limit, continuity, derivative and integral, including the fundamental theorem of calculus.

Syllabus Example

MATH 0413 or 0450
MATH 0430 - Intro Abstract Algebraic Systems

(3 Credits)

This course introduces the student to abstract algebraic concepts, rings, integral domains, fields, integers, rational, real and complex numbers, and polynomials. Many examples will be presented during class and in the homework. The students are expected to enhance their proof writing techniques.

Syllabus Example

MATH 0413 or 0450 or 1185
MATH 0450 - Introduction to Analysis

(4 Credits)

This course is intended as a first course in mathematical analysis for highly motivated students. Topics will include sets and functions, number systems, topology of Euclidean spaces, limits, continuity, and the main theorems of elementary calculus.

Consent of instructor

Offered every spring

MATH 0470 - Actuarial Mathematics I

(3 Credits)

This course will cover the material listed in the syllabus for mathematics of finance of the society of actuaries. Specifically it will present the relevant topics in the theory of interest (interest and discount rates, cash flows, annuities, amortization and sinking funds, bonds) and investment (stocks, capital asset pricing model, arbitrage pricing theory, portfolios, options). The material will be presented in the traditional academic format of lectures and help sessions along with optional sessions directed specifically at preparing students for the SOA exam.

(Formerly Math 1120)

Syllabus Example

Corequisite: Math 0230 or 0235
MATH 0480 - Applied Discrete Mathematics

(3 Credits)

The purpose of this course is to introduce first or second year students to important discrete structures that appear in both pure and applied math as well as computer science, computer engineering, computer security and information systems. Math 0480 will be an excellent preparation for classes in Combinatorics, Graph Theory, Algebra and Number Theory. Topics include sets, functions, sequences, algorithms, growth of functions, complexity of algorithms, induction, counting, discrete probability, graphs and trees, discrete geometry, network flows, the Traveling Salesperson Problem and discrete optimization.

MATH 0220
MATH 0500 - Professional Developement

(1 Credit)

The Professional Development course is a 1-credit course required of all Mathematics majors. It will assist students to progress through the major and toward their career goals, and to attain skills in technical writing and programming.

Syllabus Example

MATH 0413 or MATH 0450

Upper Level Undergraduate Courses

Class Course Description Course prerequisites
MATH 1010 - Putnam Seminar

(2 Credits)

The aim of this course is to develop the capacity to solve mathematical problems involving a substantial element of ingenuity and perseverance. Training will involve the study of problems from previous Putnam competitions, for which this course can be regarded as a useful preparation. An attempt will be made to look for unifying mathematical ideas. General strategies for solving problems will also be discussed.

Consent of instructor
MATH 1020 - Applied Elementary Number Theory

(3 Credits)

This course will reveal the key role played by number theory in the development of mathematics. Some applications of number theory will be covered in the course.

Syllabus Example

MATH 0430
MATH 1025 - Introduction to Mathematical Cryptography

(3 Credits)

The course covers the theoretical underpinnings of cryptosystems and the analysis of their limitations and vulnerabilities. Special emphasis will be placed on public key cryptosystems, including elliptic curve based systems. Real world applications such as browser security and bitcoin will be discussed. 

Syllabus Example

MATH 0430
MATH 1050 - Combinatorial Mathematics

Topics covered include the binomial theorem, inclusion exclusion principle, recurrence relations, generating functions, and coloring problems.

MATH 0413 or 0450 or 1185
MATH 1070 - Numerical Mathematical Analysis

(3 Credits)

This course, with MATH 1080 forms a two term introduction to numerical analysis at the advanced undergraduate level and includes interpolation, numerical differentiation and integration, solution of non-linear equations, numerical solution of systems or ordinary differential equations, and additional topics as time permits. Emphasis is on understanding the algorithms rather than on detailed coding, although some programming will be required.

Syllabus Example

MATH 0240 and some programming experience
MATH 1080 - Numerical Math: Linear Algebra

(3 Credits)

This course is an introduction to numerical linear algebra which addresses numerical methods for solving linear algebraic systems and matrix Eigen problems and applications to partial differential equations. Although the course will stress a computational viewpoint, analysis of the convergences and stability of the algorithms will be investigated.

Syllabus Example

(MATH 0240 or 0245) and (MATH 0250, 0280, 1180, or 1185) and some programming experience
MATH 1100 - Linear Programming

(3 Credits)

Topics covered will include linear programming problems, the simplex method, quality, revised simplex method, and the transportation problem.

MATH 0280 or 1180

ENGCMP 0200 or 0203 or 0205, etc.

MATH 1101 - An Introduction to Optimization

(3 Credits)

This course introduces students to the techniques of optimization. Applications will be emphasized, but some theory will be addressed and proofs will be discussed. As well, students will be taught how to use available software to answer questions. Course topics will include linear programming, integer programming, nonlinear programming, convex and affine sets, convex and concave functions, unconstrained optimization, and combinatorial optimization (i.e. Network flow problems). 

Syllabus Example

MATH 0240 and one of MATH 0280, 1180, or 1185
MATH 1103 - Mathematical Problems in Business, Industry, and Government (3 Credits)

Seminar course focusing on problems from Business, Industry, and Government.

Syllabus Example

Math 1101 or Math 1360
MATH 1110 - Industrial Mathematics

(3 Credits)

This course is concerned with the approximate numerical solution of problems which arise in an industrial environment. Topics covered include physical interpretation of a mathematical model, use of library software, preparation of software, analysis of results, and reporting on findings. 

MATH 1180 and 1185
MATH 1121 - Actuarial Mathematics II

(3 Credits)

This course will cover the material listed in the syllabus for exam m (3) (mathematics of life contingencies and financial economics) of the society of actuaries. Specifically it will present the relevant topics in life insurance and life annuities, including multiple decrement models as well as the black and Scholes pricing of derivative securities and risk analysis. The material will be presented in the traditional academic format of lectures and help sessions along with optional sessions directed specifically at preparing students for the SOA exam. 

Syllabus Example

MATH 0240 or 1120
MATH 1122 - Actuarial Mathematics III

(3 Credits)

Life Contingencies

Syllabus Example

(MATH 470 or 1121) and (MATH 1119 or STAT 1151)
MATH 1123 - Actuarial Math IV

(3 Credits)

Life Contingencies, part 2

Syllabus Example

Math 1122
MATH 1126 - Predictive Analytics 1

(3 Credit)

This is an introductory topics course in modern Data Science, including Statistical Learning and Time Series. The topics that will be covered are: Linear Regression (Validation, Resampling Methods, Model Selection and Regularization, Shrinkage, Dimension Reduction, Principal Components), Generalized Linear Models (Logistic and Probit Regression Models, Categorical and Count Response, Measures of Fit), Unsupervised Learning (Decision Trees and Random Forests, Bootstrap, Bagging, Principal Components, Cluster Analysis), Time Series (Random Walk Models, Autoregressive Models, ARCH/GARCH Models, Box-Jenkins Modeling and Forecasting). 

Syllabus Example

MATH 0230 and 1119
MATH 1127 - Predictive Analytics 2

(3 Credit)

This 3-credit course is a continuation of Math 1126, "Predictive Analytics 1". It will cover the fundamental knowledge about data science with applications to insurance and business. Students will be introduced to Basic R, data acquisition, data cleanup, data exploration and visualization, predictive modeling, and professional reporting. It also prepares students for the SOA Exam PA. Upon completion of this course, students will have developed skills in predictive analytics that allow them to: (1) articulate the types of problems that can be addressed by predictive modeling, identify the business problem and how the available data relates to possible analyses, use the information to propose models such as Generalized Linear Model (GLM), Decision Trees, Cluster and Principal Components Analysis; (2) develop expertise in the use of R for predictive analytics and be able to create effective graphs in RStudio, work with various data types, understand principles of data design, and construct a variety of common visualizations for exploring data; (3) evaluate data quality, resolve data issues, and identify regulatory and ethical issues; (4) effectively communicate the results of applying predictive analytics to solve a business problem.

Syllabus Example

MATH 1126
MATH 1128 - Actuarial Mathematics V

(3 Credit)

This 3-credit course will cover the topics in "Short-Term Actuarial Mathematics 1" that provides the basis for a subsequent course in "Short-Term Actuarial Mathematics 2" as well as prepare students for the SOA STAM Exam. Students will be introduced to a variety of frequency, severity, and aggregate models that are useful for short-term actuarial applications. Students will learn the steps involved in the modeling process and how to apply these steps. At the end of the course, students will be able to: 1) analyze data from an application in a business context; 2) determine a suitable model including parameter values; 3) provide measures of confidence for decisions based upon the model. Students will be introduced to a variety of tools for the calibration and evaluation of the models.

Syllabus Example

MATH 1119 and STAT 1152
MATH 1129 - Actuarial Mathematics VI

(3 Credit)

This 3-credit course will cover the topics in "Short-Term Actuarial Mathematics 2" (STAM 2) which builds on topics in STAM 1 as well as prepare students for the SOA STAM Exam. Students will be introduced to credibility theory: prior distribution, posterior distribution, predictive distribution, Bayesian premium, Buhlmann model, Buhlmann-Straub models, credibility premium, credibility factor and empirical Bayes methods. At the end of the course, students will be able to: 1) understand and estimate losses using credibility procedures; 2) understand the fundamental principles of pricing and reserving of some of the more common short-term insurance and reinsurance coverages: auto, homeowners, liability, health, disability, and dental. Students will be introduced to some of the methods and the underlying statistical models used for estimating losses incurred from short term insurance and reinsurance coverages.

Syllabus Example

MATH 1128
MATH 1180 -  Linear Algebra

(3 Credits)

This course stresses the theoretical and rigorous development of linear algebra. Major topics include the theory of vector spaces, linear transformations, matrices, characteristic polynomials, bases and canonical forms. Other topics may be covered as time permits. 

Syllabus Example

Corequisite: MATH 0413 or MATH 0450
MATH 1185 - Honors Linear Algebra

(3 Credits)

An introduction to computational and theoretical aspects of linear algebra. Syllabus includes Gaussian elimination, matrix algebra, triangular factorization, vector spaces, linear independence, basis, dimension, orthogonality, inner product, gram-Schmidt, singular value decomposition, determinants, eigenvalues, matrix exponentials, unitary matrices, similarity, positive definiteness, minimum principles, finite elements, norm and condition number, computation of Eigen values, iterative solutions of linear systems, linear inequalities, simplex method. 

Consent of instructor

MATH 1230 - The Big Ideas of Mathematics

(3 Credits)

The "big ideas" course is intended to provide a capstone type experience for math majors. It will integrate the student's current math knowledge into a coherent whole via the adoption of a historical perspective. It is particularly aimed at math majors with an interest in math education or the history, philosophy and psychology of mathematics. Students opting for the optional internship, MATH 1231, will explore how the historical development of math relates to the math in the secondary school. The capstone experience will culminate with a research project and presentation.

MATH 0430
MATH 1231 - Internship in Math Education

(1 Credits)

This internship has two components 1) a classroom experience mentoring a high school student who is developing a research project and 2) a seminar discussing the "big ideas" of mathematics in MATH 1230 and how math is developed in the elementary and secondary school curriculum. Interns will spend one hour every two weeks mentoring a high school student at an area high school.

MATH 1230
MATH 1250 - Abstract Algebra

(3 Credits)

In this course the basic algebraic systems, groups and rings are studied in some detail. Topics include: subgroups, permutation groups, homomorphism's, subrings, ideals and quotient rings. The emphasis is on theory with examples.

Syllabus Example

MATH 0430
MATH 1270 - Ordinary Differential Equations 1

(3 Credits)

This course covers methods of solving ordinary differential equations which are frequently encountered in applications. General methods will be taught for single n-th order equations, and systems of first order nonlinear equations. This will include phase plane methods and stability analysis. Computer experimentation will be used to illustrate the behavior of solutions of various equations. 

Syllabus Example

One of MATH 0280, 1180, or 1185
MATH 1275 - Honors Ordinary Differential Equations 1

(3 Credits)

This course provides a more thorough mathematical treatment of the theory than is possible in the non-honors course (MATH 1270), and also covers some more recent applications. In addition to basic material on exact solutions, mathematical proofs will be given of the existence and uniqueness theorems, leading to a better understanding of such important topics as phase plane behavior and stability theory. In addition, more topics will be covered, including a more extensive discussion of series solutions and special functions than is possible in MATH 1270. Finally, a course project, usually done in pairs, on a topic to be chosen by the students with guidance and approval from the instructor, will be a key feature.

Syllabus Example

(MATH 0230 or 0235) and (MATH 1180 or 1185)

CoREQ: MATH 413 or 0450

MATH 1280 - Ordinary Differential Equations 2

(3 Credits)

This is a course in stability and qualitative methods for analyzing ordinary differential equations which arise in realistic models. Phase plane techniques, perturbation methods, and bifurcation theory are studied. 

MATH 1270 or 1275
MATH 1290 - Topics in Geometry

(3 Credits)

A course intended to give a "modern" view of geometry. Possible approaches include (1) the connection of geometries to abstract algebraic systems and (2) the deductive, synthetic development of Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometry. 

Syllabus Example

MATH 0240 and (MATH 0413 or 0450)
MATH 1310 - Graph Theory

(3 Credits)

The concept of a graph and the study of its theoretical properties and applications form the core of this course. Topics include paths, circuits, trees, planar graphs, coloring problems, digraphs, matching theory, and network flows.

MATH 0413 or 0450
MATH 1350 - Intro to Differential Geometry

(3 Credits)

Possible topics are the basic ideas of topology, description of curves in space, definition and local study of smooth surfaces in Euclidean space (fundamental forms, geodesics, and curvature), global properties of surfaces, gauss-bonnet formula and applications.

MATH 0240 and (MATH 1180 or 1185)
MATH 1360 -  Modeling in Applied Mathematics

(3 Credits)

This course introduces some of the fundamental approaches of applied mathematics. The emphasis is on the model-building process and on developing an understanding of some of the unifying themes of applied mathematics such as equilibria, stability, conservation laws, etc. The material is presented in the form of case studies. 

Syllabus Example

MATH 0290 or MATH 1270 or MATH 1275
MATH 1370 - Intro to Computational Neuroscience

(3 Credits)

This course presents contemporary mathematical theories of neuroscience, including single neurons and neuronal networks. Attention will be given 1451 to the dynamics and the function of neural activity.

Syllabus Example

MATH 0240 or MATH 0245 or MATH 0450
MATH 1380 - Math Biology

(3 Credits)

This course will provide a broad introduction to mathematical methods typically applied to problems in biology. Models using calculus, ordinary differential equations, partial differential equations, discrete dynamical systems, stochastic dynamics, or a cellular automata framework will be presented and principal methods for their analysis will be described. Computational methods will also be covered, including computing platforms such as XPPAUT. Throughout the course, students will have extensive opportunities to practice the development and analysis of mathematical biology models.

Syllabus Example

(MATH 0280 or 1180 or 1185) and (MATH 0290 or 1270 or 1275) 
MATH 1410 - Intro to Foundations of Mathematics

(3 Credits)

This course introduces the logical foundations of mathematics; it covers the propositional and predicate calculi, formal number theory, and Gödel's first Incompleteness Theorem. As time permits, we will also cover beginning set theory, and beginning model theory.

Math 0413 or Math 0450
MATH 1470 - Partial Differential Equations 1

(3 Credits)

This is the first term of a two-term sequence in elementary PDE's. The objectives of the course are to provide students with the techniques necessary for the formulation and solution of problems involving PDE's and to prepare for further study in PDE's. The three main types of second order linear PDE's - parabolic, elliptic, and hyperbolic are studied. In addition the tools necessary for the solution of PDE's such as Fourier series and Laplace transforms are introduced.

MATH 0240 and {[(MATH 0280 or 1180 or 1185) and (MATH 0290 or 1270)] or MATH 0250}
Math 1510 -Mathematical Theory of Probability

(3 Credits)

This course is an introduction to the mathematical theory of probability. Major topics include random variables, expecation, characteristic functions, conditional probability, and an introduction to Martingales and Markov chains.

(Math 0420 or 0450) and (MATH 280, 1180 or 1185) or Permission From Instructor
MATH 1530 -  Advanced Calculus 1

(3 Credits)

This course contains a rigorous development of the calculus of functions of a single variable, including compactness on the real line, continuity, differentiability, integration, and the uniform convergence of sequences and series of functions. Other topics may be included, such as the notion of limits and continuity in metric spaces.

MATH 0420 or MATH 0450
MATH 1540 - Advanced Calculus 2 (3 Credits)

In this course, which is a continuation of the Fall Math 1530, the theory of differentiation and integration of functions of several variables will be developed rigorously. Topics will include the inverse and implicit function theorems, Fubini's Theorem, change of variables, and Stokes' Theorem.

MATH 1530
MATH 1550 - Vector Analysis and Applications

(3 Credits)

Topics covered include: vector algebra, vector differentiation and integration, divergence, gradient, curl, the theorems of green, gauss and stokes, and curvilinear coordinate systems. There will be an emphasis upon problem solving and applications in electromagnetic theory and fluid flow. 

Syllabus Example

Semester Schedule

MATH 0240 and (MATH 250 or 0280 or 1180 or 1185)
MATH 1560 - Complex Variables and Applications

(3 Credits)

This course covers the following topics: elementary operations with complex numbers, derivatives, integrals, Cauchy's theorem and consequences such as the integral formula, power series, residue theorem, applications to real integrals and series.

[MATH 0240 or 245 (with B or better)] or MATH 1550
MATH 1570 - Intro to Fourier Analysis (3 Credits)

The course is a rigorous introduction to Fourier series and integrals with applications to heat flow, wave motion, physics, and number theory. It is intended for students with a basic knowledge of real analysis including uniform convergence of sequences and series of functions. No knowledge of the Lebasque integral is assumed. 

Syllabus Example

(Math 0420 or 0450) and (Math 0280 or 1180 or 1185)
MATH 1700 - Introduction to Topology

(3 Credits)

The topology of r1, as well as that of general metric spaces, will be studied. Basic notions will be applied to obtain the fundamental existence theorem for first order ordinary differential equations. The course will be run on a theorem proving and problem solving basis. 

MATH 0420 or 0450
MATH 1800 - Advanced Topics in Mathematics

(3 Credits)

This course seeks to provide a broad introduction to the field of machine learning. The emphasis of this course will be the development of a rigorous mathematical basis for the most commonly used algorithms in the field. Topics to be covered include clustering, dimensionality reduction, regression, optimization, and neural networks. Students will have the opportunity to implement algorithms from these topics and examine their performance on real data. A background in multivariable calculus and linear algebra is recommended. Prior programming experience is not required

MATH 0240 or 0270 or 1180
MATH 1900 Internship

(1 - 3 Credits)

Under faculty supervision the student participates in a mathematics related experience, project, or job.

Contact Undergraduate Director for Permission Number
MATH 1902 Directed Study

(1 - 3 Credits)

Under the direction of a faculty member, a student studies a mutually agreed upon topic in mathematics. 

Contact Undergraduate Director for Permission Number